Nayel’s Art

Nayel’s Art

The Artist

Nayel H. (8 years old)

Nayel is a 2nd grader with a creative and artistic side. He enjoys all kinds of artwork from drawing, painting, sculpting etc. His recent school work involved exploring different types of natural environments where he painted a rainforest to showcase all the different layers and elements. He also made chalk art capturing Northern Lights over the mountains. His best work is making a monster comic book. When he was in kindergarden learning math, all his numbers had a face and he would turn them into characters. His teacher said she sees him growing up to be a cartoonist for Disney!

Other than art he enjoys soccer, skating and learning about outer space. He got a telescope for his birthday and wants to grow up to be an astronaut. 

This piece was submitted by Nayel’s mom, Muniza (@akhtarmuniza2)

Social media, Fast Fashion, and Overconsumption (PT. 2, HUMAN RIGHTS)

Social media, Fast Fashion, and Overconsumption (PT. 2, HUMAN RIGHTS)

The Issue

If you have read my first post about the environmental side of fast fashion, you may have noticed that I have mentioned other aspects of fast fashion, like the mistreatment of workers. Before I go into more depth, I’d like to explain what a sweatshop is.

What are Sweatshops?

Sweatshops are factories with poor working conditions and violate two or more labour laws. This may include but is not limited to unfair wages, unreasonable hours, child labour and little to no benefits for workers. 

Most fast fashion companies are unethical or break worker laws as they utilize sweatshops. While some companies strive to pay their workers equally and be more transparent about their work, many don’t reveal how many hours their employees work per week. One company, SHEIN, has not publicly disclosed information about its working conditions and supply chains to the British government. “SHEIN had also previously falsely stated on its website that its factories were certified by international labour standard bodies, according to Reuters.” – VOX. 

A Chinese news source (LatePost) has reported that SHEIN  has developed a reputation for timely payment to factories. Although this is a rarity in the country, one still wonders why SHEIN does not disclose how much they pay their employees. A possibility many have thought of is that they regularly pay their workers but for extremely low wages and extremely long hours. There are still many things about Shein’s business practices that are questionable and unknown. For example, some workers are forced to meet a minimum garment count, causing them to be constantly overworked to get paid. Unless there is full transparency, it’s rather difficult to believe these fast fashion companies are ethical from a moral point of view.

So sweatshops are a thing….why would it be problematic if we close them? 

Many of these sweatshops are established because paying for human labour is actually cheaper than paying for machines that can do the work. These sweatshops are actually helping people earn money, a majority of whom are women in developing countries. “In nine out of ten countries, working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! “ – Powell (In Defense of Sweatshops) Despite the usual pay being $2.50 per hour for a worker, that is significantly higher than $2 a DAY. We may not think that is enough or a significant difference, but that money could be put towards many things. Necessities, housing, food, investments and education. All of this can change people’s lives. Studies have also shown that women who work in sweatshops are less likely to be forced into marriages because they have become self-reliant because of the money they are earning. 

Another thing to note is that people are more willing to go to these sweatshops because they are the least bad option they have. Compared to living in the rural countryside with even less pay and little to no rights, as well as a higher possibility of workplace injuries, this is a better choice for them despite the poor working conditions and hours. Low-income individuals who HAVE TO rely on fast fashion for clothing will also be hurt by the removal of sweatshops, which means clothing prices would have to rise. The closing of all sweatshops would only hurt the poor.

Despite this information, we should all try to avoid overconsumption of fast fashion brands. It’s not that you can’t if you cannot purchase clothes from more ethical brands. However, it’s good to be mindful of what you purchase and wear. Instead of trying to blame low-income individuals who only purchase a few pieces of clothing from fast fashion brands because that’s all they can afford, we should be criticizing high-income individuals and influencers who purchase $500 hauls from fast fashion brands like SHEIN when they are clearly able to afford more sustainable options. We should also be advocating for better pay in general for workers, or at least ensure they are not overworked and have employee benefits, as many cannot afford to skip a day of work even when sick.

In my next piece, I will talk about the consumers and why they may choose to overconsume fashion.

This article was written by CONNIE DONG

Maryna Salagub: Good Fairy Art

Maryna Salagub: Good Fairy Art

The Artist

Maryna Salagub, artist behind @goodfairyart lives in Oakville, ON. She is a full time self-taught watercolor artist. She started her art path in Ukraine as a child, and then moved to Canada to continue her art practice. Maryna draws whimsical watercolours of animals doing human activities as if they were living their best lives. It encourages viewers to improve their own life habits from daily routine to happier and healthier lifestyles! She strongly believes this: “Don’t search for miracles – create a miracle yourself!”

Maryna’s art not only creates a playful space, but also brings emotions – a smile on your face, a giggle, a conversation starter, motivation. Her art is used for so many purposes – from potty training to dentist offices decorating. Maryna magically transforms regular animals and gives them a personality charm – grinning shark, relaxed whale, curious bear, smart octopus. Each viewer can find a character matching his own!

Maryna is an extremely passionate artist and advocate for nature’s conservation. Her desire to draw animals is deeply rooted in profound connection to nature and a commitment to raising awareness about the critical issues facing our ecosystems. Through her art, she aims to utilize art as a powerful tool for education and advocacy.

Maryna pursues her mission of making art accessible to local communities. She participated in numerous local shows like OOAK Toronto, Oakville Originals, and The Handmade Market Niagara. She is also an active member of Oakville Art Council, where she serves as a juror. As art instructor, she made multiple workshops at Creative Hub 1352 and Culture Days ON, where participants could teach her effortless whimsical watercolor style. In 2023 she was a featured artist of Artivism Challenge by Water Docs Film Festival. 

Discover her art at www.goodfairyart.com and get inspired yourself!

Take a look at Maryna’s Instagram page at @goodfairyart

This article was written by Maryna Salagub

Art Piece: One Degree

Art Piece: One Degree

The Issue

     Winter leads many people into seeking refuge from the cold inside their houses. Did you know that changing your thermostat by just one degree can help significantly lower carbon pollution? Studies showed that simply reducing all thermostats by one degree could save roughly 40% of carbon emissions in the USA. Not only can limiting your heating help save on bills, it’s also an easy way to start lowering your carbon footprint one step at a time. So if you’re ever finding it too cold, don’t run for your heater. Instead, try layering a few clothes, snuggling under a blanket or making yourself some hot chocolate to stay warm. You may not even realize how your heating habits have changed!

Reference

Source: Energy, Carbon-Emission And Financial Savings From Thermostat Control, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2013.

This article was written by Genevieve Qua-Enoo